GNU MCU Eclipse

A family of Eclipse CDT extensions and tools for GNU ARM & RISC-V development

How to install GNU MCU Eclipse?

Overview

Although GNU MCU Eclipse is not yet a packed suite to be installed in a single step, the separate steps are relatively easy to perform, and installing the plug-ins and the tools can be successfully completed even by non-experienced users.

Note for beginners: If performed for the first time, it is recommended to follow the steps by the book and avoid poetic licenses, since they might lead to tricky situations and subtle functional problems.

The recommended sequence is described below.

Toolchain

This is generally a mandatory step for all platforms, since most platforms do not come by default with an embedded GCC toolchain (ARM or RISC-V).

Please follow the steps in the ARM Toolchain install or RISC-V Toolchain install page.

Windows Build Tools

This step is Windows specific, and it is highly recommended to use the GNU MCU Eclipse Windows Build Tools, and avoid other make.exe programs, even if they apparently work, since subtle differences in path processing exists between different versions of make.

Please follow the steps in the How to install the Windows Build Tools page.

POSIX platforms generally include make in the system distribution, or might require to install some developer packages (for example on macOS you need to install the Xcode Command Line Tools).

SEGGER J-Link is the recommended debugger and, if available, please follow the steps in the How to install the SEGGER J-Link page.

OpenOCD

For the unfortunate developers who do not have a J-Link available, the alternative is to follow the steps in the How to install the OpenOCD binaries page.

OpenOCD might be needed when using development boards with integrated debuggers, like STM32F4-DISCOVERY boards, although the recommended solution is to prepare a custom cable and connect them to J-Link.

OpenOCD is also needed when using RISC-V boards with integrated debuggers.

QEMU

QEMU is a hardware emulator that can be successfully used to run simple blinky applications, and the default tutorial requires QEMU, so it is highly recommended to install it.

Please follow the steps in the How to install the QEMU binaries page.

Java

As a prerequisite for Eclipse, Java is required.

Java is no longer a very hot technology, so it is generally not available by default on most platforms and requires separate installation.

More details are available in the How to install the GNU MCU Eclipse plug-ins page.

Eclipse & CDT

Eclipse is the development platform where the GNU MCU Eclipse plug-ins run. Generally it is not available by default on most platforms and requires separate installation.

The simple way is to download GNU MCU Eclipse IDE for C/C++ Developers from GitHub Releases and you get at once both Eclipse CDT and the MCU plug-ins.

If you prefer the manual way, be sure you install the Eclipse IDE for C/C++ Developers, not other package, since otherwise you’ll have to manually install CDT.

More details are available in the How to install the GNU MCU Eclipse plug-ins page.

Note: on GNU/Linux be sure you manually install the Eclipse; DO NOT try to install it via the Synaptics package manager, or similar, since usually you get an older version and the CDT plug-ins are not included.

Plug-ins

Once the Java & Eclipse are functional, please proceed with plug-ins install, as explains in the How to install the GNU MCU Eclipse plug-ins page.

Workspace preferences

As the last install step, but actually a step to be performed after creating each and any Eclipse workspace, it is highly recommended to follow the steps in the Workspace preferences page.